Louisiana

During my semester in Copenhagen, I am taking part in a Danish Culture Course. This means I get to learn about Danish history, art, architecture etc., and it all counts towards my university credits.

As part of this course, we also get to take part in excursions to different landmarks in Copenhagen throughout the semester. Last weekend, we ventured to the modern art museum ‘Louisiana.’

I am not an art expert, nor have I ever tried to be. In fact, the idea of heading to an art museum intimidated me. I had no experience, or prior exposure to modern art so I presumed that this trip to Louisiana was going to be beyond me, and I would spend an afternoon feeling stupid, trying to gather meaning from art I didn’t understand.

I couldn’t have been more wrong.

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As soon as I entered the front door to what looked like a manor like home, I was in awe of the spacious landscape and view that lay before me. Because we travelled with the university, we were given a lecture outlining the featured artists in the museum as well as the history of the museum itself. (While I thought this was going to be an hour of my life I’d never get back, it proved to be beneficial and was actually very interesting.)

We were told that the founder of Louisiana, Knud W. Jensen wanted to create a museum with soul, where the Danish public could encounter modern art. He wanted to create something that wasn’t pretentious, but rather something that spoke directly to the viewer. It was always envisioned that Louisiana was not just to be for the elite but to include experiences and visions for a wide audience. This is certainly understood through the experience at Louisiana, children of all ages are free to roam the space and even interact and play with the modern art features in the garden, such as the solar system piece. People are encouraged to have an enjoyable day out, exploring Louisiana at their own pace.

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The Solar System displayed in the garden of Louisiana

Knud W. Jensen, is also known for his ‘sauna principle’ where the exhibitions were divided into hot and cold varieties. The ‘hot’ consisted of artists that were already known, while the ‘cold’ gave room for names the guests had never heard of. This mix allowed the museum to entice guests, while also offering something they were not expecting, expanding their knowledge and perception of modern art.

The first piece of unexpected art I encountered was the spectacular, panoramic view of Sweden that lay before me when entering the museum. This was the first of many photo and Instagram opportunities.

After the lecture we were free to roam around, I was shocked by the joy I was getting from looking at artwork. The paintings were easy to interpret, but subjective and the circular layout of the museum is done so there is a constant flow and direction when wondering around.

Louisiana is also known for holding different exhibitions throughout the year, we were lucky enough to be able to see ‘The Moon’ exhibition, where art was mixed with science. This offered plenty of beautiful pieces while educating the general public about the moon landing, as well as myths, stories and the future of human’s relationship with the moon.

After adventures around the exhibition was done, we headed over to the museums café for something to eat. Everyone who had gotten food was impressed, and the afternoon was finished off with the taste of my first Danish pastry! It did not disappoint!

Overall, I am so grateful that I had the opportunity to visit Louisiana. For anyone who is planning a visit to Copenhagen, it is certainly worth a visit.

How I’m Copen: 9/10

‘Art enables us to find ourselves and lose ourselves at the same time’ – Thomas Merton

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